StoryWorld Quest – Great Conference Recap from Matt Doherty


StoryWorld Quest is a three-day conference in Edmonton, Alberta Canada that discussed the latest in storyworld design and telling, bringing together experts from the digital, film, television and transmedia spaces. 

Keynotes, panels and open forum discussions took place that defined the latest in narrative strategies with insights from filmmakers, producers, technologists, broadcasters, developers, game designers, writers, academics, and marketing executives. ‘ 

Source: www.slideshare.net

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Big Hero 6 Proves It: Pixar’s Gurus Have Brought the Magic Back to Disney Animation | WIRED


John Lasseter is tearing up. His eyes are shining and his lashes are moist. He reaches out a warm hand to cover mine and looks deep into my eyes as he talks. He’s feeling things, powerful things, and it’s impossible not to feel them too. From any other studio executive, this would come across as insincere, even manipulative, but Lasseter, chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar, is quite possibly the most earnest, emotional, enthusiastic man working in Hollywood….

Source: www.wired.com

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The Internet Archive releases tools to let anyone store community content forever


The Internet Archive, the nonprofit repository for content on the Internet, announced today a strategic shift, putting it in the position of storage-dump provider that “communities” can tap if and when they see fit.

“We are creating new tools to help every media-based community build their own collections on a long-term platform that is available to the entire world for free,” the nonprofit’s founder, Brewster Kahle, wrote in a blog post today. “Collectors will be able to upload media, reference media from other collections, use tools to coordinate the activities of their community, and create a distinct Internet presence while also offering users the chance to explore diverse collections of other content.”

Source: venturebeat.com

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Whisper, Secret, and Snapchat leaks show that fake privacy is almost worse than no privacy at all


Last week in an investigative story the Guardian revealed that anonymous social feed Whisper is actually collecting user locations based on geolocation and IP addresses.

The report also says that Whisper is saving posts and their location information to a searchable database, despite its promise to be “the safest place on the Internet.” But the revelation about Whisper is just the latest in a string of incidents that remind users that many, if not all, of the consumer apps on the market that promise anonymity and security fail to deliver.

Secret has shown it’s vulnerable to hacking, though the company does have a bug bounty program that has successfully kept Secret out of the news, as Wired reported. But the same can’t be said for Snapchat, which repeatedly finds its way into the news, most recently for a leak of 200,000 user photos that ended up on Internet forum 4chan. Though Snapchat’s servers weren’t hacked in this particular event, the ephemeral messaging service has been found to be less secure — and less ephemeral — than it advertises. The company settled charges with the Federal Trade Commission in May for overstated claims of user anonymity and security.

Source: venturebeat.com

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